Gardening Gardens Plants

The brighter side

Since May there has hardly fallen any rain here. The plants are struggling, and so are we with the high temperatures in their 30’s making manual labour during the day a sweaty chore. I have found myself moaning a lot about the weather lately, so I decided to list some of the things that have turned out well due to this hot weather.

Ripe tomatoes

Tomatoes have ripende even though they are not in the greenhouse. We don’t have a greenhouse at the moment. We bought a new one last year, a beautiful one from Gabriel Ash, but unfortunately we have not found the time to put it up yet. So the tomatoes have had to live outside, and they have really liked it in this hot weather.

TT_19072018-33.jpg
First proper harvest of tomatoes from outdoor grown tomatoes.

We might get ripe sweet corn

I grow sweet corn every year, but four out of five years we never get a crop because the season isn’t long enough. This year we have hope that it will actually ripen so we can enjoy delicious sweet corn harvested straight from the garden.

IMG_9343

Drought tolerant plants are thriving

Aeoniums, Agaves, Salvia argentea and other drought tolerant plants are really thriving in a sunny position. Everything in pots do actually get watered, unlike the garden itself which is never watered. The dark leaved Aeonium have never been as dark as they are this year though.

TT_19072018-56.jpg
Agave americana, Aeonium ‘Zwartkop’ and ‘Poldark’

 

Clematis are flowering their socks off

Granted, the Clematis performs well every year, but even this year, when there has been so little rain, they look really smashing. We grow mainly group 3 Clematis, the varieties that should be cut back every spring as most Clematis usually freeze to the ground anyway in our climate.

TT_19072018-35.jpg
Summer Snow
TT_19072018-42.jpg
‘Myrvold’
TT_19072018-44.jpg
Summer Snow
TT_19072018-49.jpg
‘Little Nell’

4 comments on “The brighter side

  1. Craig Hunter

    Great looking ok at the positives of this dry hot weather

    Like

  2. Rebecca Bisbee

    Wait, do you mean I should be cutting my clematis to the ground after blooming?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: